In this candid interview with Christine Mitchell, Executive Director of the Center for Bioethics, Dr. Angell discusses the progress that has been made in medical ethics, and the setbacks that have kept other issues in play.

Michele Bratcher Goodwin

Connecting the human brain to a computer is no longer science fiction. Patients unable to control their bodies will soon be able to control computers and external devices, like wheelchairs, using only mental processes, by means of a brain-computer interface. A Neuroethics Seminar Series Event with Philipp Kellmeyer and Leigh Hochberg

 

A conversation on the importance of bioethics with UPenn President Amy Gutmann and Harvard Provost Alan Garber.

Panelists discuss the ethics of presumed (or "emergency", or "implied") consent in the context of caring for patients with acute stroke. A Neuroethics Seminar Series Event with Winston Chiong, Lee Schwamm, and Jolion McGreevy

UPenn's Gutmann and Harvard's Garber to speak at annual bioethics lecture

Watch the streaming video of author Daniel Callahan discussing his book at an HMS public forum

Should the FDA regulate the sale of these devices? Should use of brain stimulation to enhance performance in gaming and recreation be prohibited, discouraged, encouraged, or required? Should a physician's prescription be required? Watch our panel discuss the science, ethics, and regulation of do-it-yourself brain stimulation and other forms of cognitive enhancement.

What are the implications of detecting consciousness in someone who looks and acts unconscious? Can and should this information be used to treat patients and manage expectations of caregivers? If so, how? The use of technology to detect consciousness raises a host of questions not only pertinent to medicine and science, but also to law, philosophy, ethics and beyond – questions at the heart of what it means to be conscious, and to recognize consciousness in others.

Visible Solutions

Can brain imaging be a “pain-o-meter” that tells courts when a person is in pain?  Can fMRI help us discern whether intractable chronic pain is “all in your head” or all in the brain – or will it require us to reconsider that distinction?

Since alterations in the brain have the potential to alter cognition, personality, and even the sense of self, do surgical innovations require special ethical consideration? Should "invasiveness" matter ethically, or do we simply weigh risks against benefits?  Should we have distinct policy or regulation regarding neurosurgical innovation? Do patients contemplating such innovations require special protections?